Offender Number

Number refers to the identification number given to each Ohio inmate upon incarceration. Numbers are assigned in chronological order.  However, if an inmate is returned to prison because of a technical parole violation, he or she is given the same number as the original incarceration.  Inmates being returned to prison for the commission of a new crime will be assigned a new number.  Numbers for male inmates begin with "A" and have six digits.  (Some male inmate numbers begin with "R". This was previously used to designate a younger, or "reformatory" inmate.  While this designation is no longer used, some "R" numbers still exist.)  Inmate numbers for females are five digits (plus a leading zero) and begin with "W".

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Date of Admission

"Admission Date" is the date in which the offender was originally received by the Department.

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Residential County

This is the county in which the offender resides while on under APA supervision.  Searching on this field can only be done for those offenders whose status is "APA Supervision," since it canít be known where an offender intends to reside while the offender is still incarcerated.

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Zip Code

Like the "residential county," this is the zip code of the address in which the offender resides while on under APA Supervision.  Searching on this field can only be done for those offenders whose status is "APA Supervision," since it canít be known where an offender intends to reside while the offender is still incarcerated.

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Status

Offenders are either "Incarcerated" or "APA Supervision."  The designation of "APA Supervision" is the status on the date the offender was released from incarceration.

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Parole or Release Detail
If an offender has been released or paroled, detail of that release or parole will appear here.  If an offender is incarcerated there will be no information.

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Sentences - The above information may not contain a complete list of sentencing information for each offender.

The term imposed by the judge for crimes committed on or after July 1, 1996. Prison officials cannot reduce the term for any reason without the judgeís approval.  There is one exception: officials may grant "earned credit" of one day for each month that the inmate successfully participates in certain prison programs.

The offender is sentenced to a specific time in prison (e.g., two years).  A definite sentence expires when the time imposed is served or reduced by "good time" and/or "earned credits."  (Good time and/or earned credits under old law could reduce a definite sentence by approximately one-third of the sentence imposed by the judge).

The offender is sentenced to a range of time in prison with minimum and maximum components (e.g., two to ten years).  The minimum sentence is determined by the judge from a range set by statute; the maximum sentence is set by statute.  The minimum sentence can be reduced by good time and earned credits.  With the exception of inmates serving death sentences, the Ohio Parole Board decides when the offender is suitable for release after serving the minimum sentence minus good time and/or earned credits.  Offenders cannot be kept after their maximum sentence expires.

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Mandatory Sentence

A mandatory sentence is essentially a sentence that the judge canít shorten through judicial release, nor can the Department attempt to shorten it by asking for 'transitional control' (furlough), intensive program placement (e.g., boot camps), etc.  Once the mandatory portion of a sentence is served, however, some flexibility returns regarding any remaining time.

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MDO

Because of the quantity of drugs involved, a major drug offender (MDO) has received a prison term that is from one to 10 years longer than the maximum term usually available for level of offense committed.  Example: Offender A was convicted of possessing more than 100 grams of crack cocaine, an F-1.  The court gives him a 10 year term (the maximum for F-1s) plus an additional 5 years (from the 1-10 year additional range) for being an MDO.  Offender Aís total sentence is 15 years.

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RVO

Because of a conviction for a prior, high-level, violent felony, a repeat violent offender (RVO) has received a prison term that is from one to 10 years longer than the maximum term usually available for level of offense committed.  Example: Offender B was convicted of aggravated burglary, an F-1.  He had a prior aggravated robbery conviction. The court sentences him to 10 years (the maximum for F-1s) plus an additional 8 years (from the 1-10 year added range) for being an RVO. Offender Bís total sentence is 18 years.

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Gun Specification

Gun specification is mandatory time that is served in addition to an offender's sentence if the court finds that the offender had a firearm on or about his person or under his control while committing the offense and displayed the firearm, brandished the firearm, indicated that he possessed the firearm, or used it to facilitate the offense.  It must run consecutive to other time sentenced (e.g., stated prison term, definite sentence, etc.)

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Next Parole Hearing Date

If this date is in the future, the inmate's case will be reviewed by the Ohio Parole Board approximately two months prior to the date indicated.  This allows time for the hearing to be held and a decision to be made prior to the date given in this search.  If the date shown is past, this is the date of the latest parole hearing.

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Transitional Control

A transfer up to 180 days prior to the expiration of a prison term or release on parole, under closely monitored supervision and confinement in the community, such as a stay in a licensed halfway house or restriction to an approved residence on electronic monitoring in accordance with section 2967.26 of the Ohio Revised Code.

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Earliest Possible Transfer Date

This date reflects the earliest date on which the inmate could be released to transitional control.

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POA Date

This date reflects the earliest date on which the inmate will be released on APA Supervision.  POA is an acronym for "parole on or after."  "PRD" is an acronym for "Projected Release Date."

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Supervision End Date/Early Termination from Supervision

The ending of supervision for any offender prior to the scheduled expiration of supervision term (date) because the offenderís performance and/or compliance fulfills or exceeds all of the sentencing court, Parole Board or APA imposed supervision plan objectives, conditions, special conditions, and sanction requirements.

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Expiration of Supervision Term

The maximum period of time any offender remains under the control and/or supervision of the Adult Parole Authority, as specified by the sentencing courtís journal entry, Ohio Revised Code or Parole Board minutes.

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Victim

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Post Release Control

A period of supervision for an offender sentenced under Senate Bill 2 that occurs after the offender has served the Stated Prison Term.  The sentencing judge must include Post Release Control in the offender's sentence in order for the Parole Board to impose this period of supervision.

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Expired Stated Term

The expiration date of the prison term imposed by the sentencing judge reduced by jail time credit per ORC section 2967.19.1.

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Prison Sanction Time

A response to a violation(s) of Post Release Control imposed by a representative of the Parole Board at a hearing that includes a specific term of days of incarceration not to exceed nine (9) months.  The sanction is generally served in a state correctional institution; however, time served in a county jail must be credited.

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